Superbowl 2015 Ads

Always super Bowl Ad Girl Power
By Amy Valentine   |   February 3, 2015

Each year, millions watch the SuperBowl, eagerly anticipating the expensive ads. At $4.5 million for a 30 second spot, did this year’s crop meet expectations? If you’re a 45-year-old mom, the answer is probably “yes” as I propose 2015 to be “The Year of the ‘Mom-Ad’ Superbowl.”

Usually, we see beer and cars advertised heavily, with a healthy dose of beautiful babes, tear-jerking dogs befriending Clydesdales, and with some gut-slapping humor thrown in. While 2015’s Superbowl had a good smattering of ads featuring half naked women (Carl Jr’s Au Naturel Burger Ad), tear-jerking puppy-horse friendships (Budweiser’s Lost Dog Ad) and humor (Snicker’s Brady Bunch Ad), we also had ads that particularly appealed to the mothers in the audience.

Perhaps because I was watching the Patriots beat the Seahawks this year with a bunch of families, I noticed how many teary eyes there were in the crowd during certain ads.

 

 

 

http://youtu.be/ibgvkXm9Qkc

 

http://youtu.be/iq2Sm2XGv_s

Even two ads that were ostensibly about dads seemed to appeal more to the moms in our crowd than to the actual dads, qualifying them as “mom ads” as well.

 

 

http://youtu.be/Bd1qCi5nSKw

 

Obviously, there were ads that appealed to the men in the crowd: Pierce Brosnan wanting to turn a Kia ad about a man driving through snow to his cabin on a mountaintop into a car chase/spy thriller, the sexy Italian Fiat commercial about a little blue pill, and the silly arm wrestling ad for the last yellow Skittles in a bowl. But, I rest my case that this year was “The ‘Mom-Ad’ Superbowl” year with this one:

After all, anyone who has followed the meteoric rise in popularity of the Shades of Grey book phenomena knows that 45-year-old moms are the target audience. After all, with 100 million books sold, that’s as almost as many people as the approximately 120 million who watched the Superbowl this year!

by Amy Valentine

 

 

 

About the Author

Amy, DeLaune's project manager, helps the office run smoothly, moving projects from client to writer to editor to art.

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